Are you a big yoghurt fan and are not sure what your best options are on the LCHF diet? Fear not, Gary Fettke on this episode of the LCHF Podcast, tells you which yoghurts are best to eat, and which to avoid. He also tells you what to look out for on food labels.

Transcript

Welcome onto this edition of the LCHF podcast, my name is Brad Brown, we’ve got Dr Gary Fettke with us once again and a question in from Greg Dardegon. Doc, Greg’s got a couple of questions. He says he’s been following a Banting or LCHF diet for about a month now. He’s trying particularly to watch the amount of carbs he’s getting in. He says he’s got two questions.

When he’s choosing a product, is the best thing to focus on the carb proportion when deciding it will be okay when looking at the label? Because he’s seen that low fat yoghurt for example, seem to have lower carbs per 100g than some say double cream or full fat yoghurts.

Even when he looks at the likes of the sugary soft drinks like Coca Cola, it says 11g per 100g. So in theory, if you look at the lists on the Real Meal Revolution, for example, that could theoretically be on the orange and he knows it isn’t.

He just wants to check if he should be looking at the carbs per 100g is that the best guide and then he was also asking on the yoghurt front, he’s noticed that all flavoured yoghurts have more carbs than plain. Is the main difference between the two, is that the main difference or can he eat a flavoured yoghurt and still be okay? Those flavoured yoghurts, you think you’re eating a healthy food, but they’re not really are they Doc?

The yoghurt isle is the most confusing in the supermarket

Gary Fettke: I think one of the most confusing sections of the supermarket is the yoghurt area and when you start looking at labels and start reading them, in principle, things I see with low fat yoghurts is that they are lower in fat. But the trouble is they’re virtually, the moment you lower the amount of fat in food, it starts tasting like cardboard and they get around that by adding sugars to it. They may add them indirectly by increasing the amount of fruit in them, but most of the times they’re actually increasing the amount of just straight sugar.

Low fat yoghurts in principle are higher in sugar and they’re higher in carbohydrate. We’ve got some low fat yoghurts in Australia which have got more sugar in them than ice cream. So it’s definitely something, number one, avoid the low fat yoghurts because they’re virtually all going to have added sugar.

If you’re going to look at the rest of the yoghurts, my principle there is look for a full fat yoghurt or a natural yoghurt and then look at the amount of sugar in it rather than the amount of carbohydrates. If you look at it, you’ll find some as low as 3-4% and they can range up to 10-11% and the moment they start to get up to 10-11%, you’re going to start thinking they’ve been adding some sugar into it to make them a little bit more palatable.

A Greek yoghurt for some people is quite bitter, so there isn’t any real way around that, apart from getting used to that taste. Be careful in the yoghurts, just look at the fat content, go for a full fat one and look more at the sugar rather than the carbohydrate, that would be my simple advice to Greg on that one.

BB: Excellent stuff. Greg, thanks for being in touch and thank you for your time today Doc, much appreciated. We look forward to catching up again soon here on the LCHF podcast. Don’t forget, you can get your questions in, just head over to the website, submit them there and we could be answering yours next time out. Until then, look after yourself, take care.

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Transcript

Welcome onto this edition of the LCHF podcast, my name is Brad Brown, we’ve got Dr Gary Fettke with us once again and a question in from Greg Dardegon. Doc, Greg’s got a couple of questions. He says he’s been following a Banting or LCHF diet for about a month now. He’s trying particularly to watch the amount of carbs he’s getting in. He says he’s got two questions.

When he’s choosing a product, is the best thing to focus on the carb proportion when deciding it will be okay when looking at the label? Because he’s seen that low fat yoghurt for example, seem to have lower carbs per 100g than some say double cream or full fat yoghurts.

Even when he looks at the likes of the sugary soft drinks like Coca Cola, it says 11g per 100g. So in theory, if you look at the lists on the Real Meal Revolution, for example, that could theoretically be on the orange and he knows it isn’t.

He just wants to check if he should be looking at the carbs per 100g is that the best guide and then he was also asking on the yoghurt front, he’s noticed that all flavoured yoghurts have more carbs than plain. Is the main difference between the two, is that the main difference or can he eat a flavoured yoghurt and still be okay? Those flavoured yoghurts, you think you’re eating a healthy food, but they’re not really are they Doc?

The yoghurt isle is the most confusing in the supermarket

Gary Fettke: I think one of the most confusing sections of the supermarket is the yoghurt area and when you start looking at labels and start reading them, in principle, things I see with low fat yoghurts is that they are lower in fat. But the trouble is they’re virtually, the moment you lower the amount of fat in food, it starts tasting like cardboard and they get around that by adding sugars to it. They may add them indirectly by increasing the amount of fruit in them, but most of the times they’re actually increasing the amount of just straight sugar.

Low fat yoghurts in principle are higher in sugar and they’re higher in carbohydrate. We’ve got some low fat yoghurts in Australia which have got more sugar in them than ice cream. So it’s definitely something, number one, avoid the low fat yoghurts because they’re virtually all going to have added sugar.

If you’re going to look at the rest of the yoghurts, my principle there is look for a full fat yoghurt or a natural yoghurt and then look at the amount of sugar in it rather than the amount of carbohydrates. If you look at it, you’ll find some as low as 3-4% and they can range up to 10-11% and the moment they start to get up to 10-11%, you’re going to start thinking they’ve been adding some sugar into it to make them a little bit more palatable.

A Greek yoghurt for some people is quite bitter, so there isn’t any real way around that, apart from getting used to that taste. Be careful in the yoghurts, just look at the fat content, go for a full fat one and look more at the sugar rather than the carbohydrate, that would be my simple advice to Greg on that one.

BB: Excellent stuff. Greg, thanks for being in touch and thank you for your time today Doc, much appreciated. We look forward to catching up again soon here on the LCHF podcast. Don’t forget, you can get your questions in, just head over to the website, submit them there and we could be answering yours next time out. Until then, look after yourself, take care.

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